Why 2012 is not the End

Dylan Eekhoff

Dylan Eekhoff, reporter
January 12, 2012
Filed under Opinion

“Mass hysteria” isn’t exactly a term heard in everyday conversations, but the idea of it has been present for countless years.  Not many people recognize the fact that we’ve all participated in mass hysteria at some point. It’s when people are influenced by one another’s actions or beliefs, whether delusions or actualities. The most recent example on the majority’s mind happens to be the theory of the earth’s end in 2012, derived from the Mayan calendar. What doesn’t make sense to me is how nobody dives deeper than the surface and questions the legitimacy of these theories.

Now, does “Y2K” ring any bells? I remember being only six years old and not worrying about it at all. Three years after that, a planet was supposed to collide with earth. Nothing happened. We were supposed to go into an ice age after people noticed a “global cooling”. Now, the global temperature has reached heights that excite Al Gore. Harold Camping, the borderline corpse of a pastor, predicted the end of times… twice… and was incorrect. Twice.

What makes this 2012 theory different from all those? They all had legitimate scientific and religious evidence. The truth about theories based on astronomical phenomenon is they’re all crap. Please, tell me how the light of distant stars is relevant to ANYTHING about the end of the earth. Religious texts aren’t as reliable as we think. The bible was translated hundreds of times. ONE is unreliable enough, seeing as so many things are lost in translation.

The Mayan calendar supposedly ends on December 21, 2012, signifying the end of earth’s long life. The thing I would like believers to ponder is; why is it only “mentioned” in the calendar? Don’t you think the end of the world would be written about distinctly and excessively and not just implied by the ending of a calendar?

The thing that upsets me about these speculations is the reaction from the believers. If you believe it, you need to get a grip on reality. Last year, thanks to Harold Camping, a woman slit the wrists of her daughters, and almost took her own life in front of them while they were still conscious, all because she believed Camping’s predictions and didn’t want her children to be alive to witness the apocalypse. They all survived. Now, the children have to live with the fact that their mother tried to kill them. That’s just messed up.

If there’s any kind of end that we should be anticipating, it should be a collision between a meteor and earth. Although it seems to be the most logical and likely scenario, the chances of it happening are next to none. Our earth has been floating around for 4.5 billion years, and it hasn’t been hit with a meteor large enough to destroy it yet.

On the 21st of December, you won’t find me inside an underground shelter with an assortment of weapons and canned goods. I’ll be doing whatever I please, and continue on living like a normal person.

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